Where did Meditation come from?

Where did meditation come from?

Meditation can lead to a natural, spontaneous state of expanded awareness that has probably been around as long as humans walked the  earth. Perhaps it was first experienced by hunters, craftsmen, artists, singers, dancers, drummers, lovers, and stargazers, each in their own way. People can experience meditative states whenever they dedicate themselves with total intensity into their life’s calling.  But what is the most dependable way to reach a meditative state?

The knowledge of how to intentionally cultivate meditative states has been passed down from teacher to student for ages. Meditation does not come from Northern Europe, India, Japan, or Tibet — those are just places the knowledge was cultivated for awhile, and the sages in those places created chants to convey the knowledge that was revealed to them – as  a way too embody the knowledge and pass it along.

Human beings have been using tools for hundreds of thousands of years, according to the archaeologists. It’s probably more likely they have been using sophisticated mental tools for tens of thousands of years too. Hunters, for example, sometimes have to make themselves still for hours. They have to merge with the forest and not even think, lest they scare the prey away. Then they leap into action with total precision at a moment’s notice — that’s Zen in a nutshell. Hunters teach each other these skills, through verbal instruction and example.

Human beings are always wondering, Who am I? Why am I here? And what are the rhythms of the natural world around me? and meditation is a natural emergence of that inquisition. There are thousands of meditation techniques, and all of them are appropriate for someone, somewhere.

Yogis or rishis (seers) are the ones we have heard the most from, really because they were clear they wanted to convey the knowledge of self-discovery to others. That is why we always think of yogis in the Himalayas when we think of meditation.

In modern Western culture meditation hasn’t really been valued. First, it doesn’t seem exciting, it sure isn’t fun to watch someone meditate. Plus we want instant gratification. To get the benefits from meditation you have to do it yourself. It’s like exercise, you don’t get the benefits by hanging out with people who exercise or by reading about it. You have to do it. Meditation isn’t a talked about part of our Judeo-Christian culture either, and a lot of people are afraid of it because they don’t know what it is and they think that perhaps they might have to turn Buddhist or Hindu. And, meditation got a bad rap in the 70’s with gurus driving expensive cars and hanging out with rock stars. Scientists are now discovering proven benefits or meditation outweigh any question of its relevance in the search for psychological well being and its effectiveness in creating health.

Advertisements

Share this Blog

Bookmark and Share